Breaking News

Flashback: Charles Lieber’s Liquid Computing

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Imagine a computer, suspended in a flask of liquid, which assembles itself when the liquid is poured onto a desktop. Sound like science fiction? Hyman professor of chemistry Dr. Charles Lieber was making it happen in his laboratory in 2001.

In light of scientists around the world finding never seen before self-assembling nanotechnology in Covid injections, an article written in 2001 about Lieber’s liquid computing indicates that the technology isn’t new, it’s only new to us.

Charles Leiber and two Chinese nationals were charged in January 2020 with aiding the People’s Republic of China.

Since 2008 Dr. Lieber who had served as the Principal Investigator of the Lieber Research Group at Harvard University, which specialised in the area of nanoscience, had received more than $15,000,000 in grant funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Department of Defence (DOD). These grants require the disclosure of significant foreign financial conflicts of interest, including financial support from foreign governments or foreign entities. Unbeknownst to Harvard University, beginning in 2011 Lieber became a “Strategic Scientist” at Wuhan University of Technology (WUT) in China and was a contractual participant in China’s Thousand Talents Plan from in or about 2012 to 2017.

Harvard University Professor and Two Chinese Nationals Charged in Three Separate China Related Cases, US Department of Justice, 28 January 2020

“Fact-checking” blog Snopes immediately debunked the theory that Lieber’s arrest had anything to do with a leaked bioweapon from Wuhan and featured a blog that “painstakingly demonstrates almost nothing in this conspiracist narrative matches the known facts.” The blog was published on 18 February 2020 but updated on 22 December 2021:

Lieber’s arrest had nothing to do with the novel coronavirus … While some may find these arrests to be suspect, the Department of Justice made no mention of coronavirus or biological warfare in their complaints.

Was Charles Lieber Arrested for Selling the COVID-19 Coronavirus to China? Snopes, 18 February 2020

According to American Media Periscope, Harvard knew Lieber was working with WUT. “They had a Joint Nano Key Laboratory and Lieber was the director as well as the ‘strategic scientist’ for WUT. Harvard profited from his pioneering nanotech. As did the DOD, DARPA, NIH, and China.”

In December 2021, Lieber was convicted of six felony charges related to his receipt of millions of dollars in research funding from China.  In early February 2022, Lieber filed a motion for an acquittal or new trial.  At the beginning of September Lieber’s motion was denied. His sentencing date is set for 1 January 2023.

Read more:


Let’s not lose touch…Your Government and Big Tech are actively trying to censor the information reported by The Exposé to serve their own needs. Subscribe now to make sure you receive the latest uncensored news in your inbox…


The following was originally published in Harvard Magazine, November-December 2001 as ‘Liquid Computing’ by Jonathan Shaw.  No edits have been made including American-British spelling.

Imagine a computersuspended in a flask of liquid, which assembles itself when the liquid is poured onto a desktop. Sound like science fiction? Hyman professor of chemistry Charles Lieber is making it happen in his laboratory, where researchers have already created tiny logic circuits and memory – the two main components of a computer – in just this manner. And these circuits are tiny, just a few atoms across.

Lieber and his team of chemists have done a kind of end-run around the silicon-based microelectronics industry, which for the last 35 years has been making transistors – tiny switches that can be either on or off – exponentially smaller every 18 to 24 months. Intel chairman emeritus Gordon Moore observed this doubling of computing capacity as early as 1965, and his observation became codified as “Moore’s Law.” However, says Lieber, “continued shrinkage ultimately becomes problematic in terms of just how one achieves [it].” Scientists anticipate that we will reach the limits of our ability to create silicon chips using standard fabrication line methods sometime between 2012 and 2017.

That’s because manufacturers today create microelectronic circuits either by depositing silicon on a surface or by etching it away (for example, with acid). But just as metal after it rusts “is sort of rough,” says Lieber, current methods for working with silicon leave rough surfaces that, on the nanometer scale (a nanometer is one billionth of a meter, or one hundred-thousandth the width of a human hair), constitute an ever greater proportion of the tiny wires that make up those circuits. “Ultimately, you can’t keep using those methods,” he says, “because things will be very non-uniform on a small scale. The smaller circuits become, the more imperfections in the manufacturing process begin to play a role in their performance.”

Lieber has “philosophical differences” with the industry’s “top-down” approach to nanotechnology – taking big things and making them smaller. “The way to truly revolutionize the future,” he says, “is to take a completely different approach: build things from the bottom up.” He has done that by starting with the smallest of building blocks – wires only three nanometers across that can be produced relatively cheaply on a bench top with a few thousand dollars’ worth of equipment.

Lieber makes the building blocks using a catalyst that favors growth in only one direction. A key characteristic of the process he developed is that it enables nanowires to be prepared in virtually any “flavor” (i.e., with specific conductive properties). Mixing and matching flavors can then lead to different types of devices. The devices are made in an equally simple manner: an alcohol solution of a specific nanowire flavor is poured through a grooved channel in a polymer block to produce an array of parallel wires. Another set of wires can be laid perpendicular to the first simply by rotating the apparatus 90 degrees. Already, his lab has produced a transistor just 10 atoms across.

The potential application in microelectronics is obvious: the minute size of these building blocks allows for higher transistor densities, which could lead, at least in principle, to more highly integrated and powerful computers. In 10 or 20 years there might be no more need for hard disks, because solid-state memory could store so much data. The nanowire computers of the future will be quite different from those we use today because they will require new kinds of computer architecture and software. Ultimately, the most exciting thing about nanotechnologies is not the sheer power that such a computer could provide, says Lieber, but the fact that “you get fundamentally new properties that you can’t even conceive of when dealing with conventional materials by scaling them down.”

In very small objects, for example, the ratio of the surface area to the interior volume is much larger. “Things that happen at the surface can therefore affect the whole structure,” says Lieber. While an electrical engineer might regard that as a problem, it is a property that can be used to advantage. “Normally a molecule binding to the surface of a transistor wouldn’t have a big effect,” he explains, “but imagine a protein with a charge on it coming up to something very small, where the surface is a big component. You bring this charged body up, and it biologically or chemically switches the transistor. In essence, you can electrically detect when you have a protein, a nucleic acid, or anything else.” What you have created is a sensor.

Hence, Lieber is now working on a “proof of concept” for the National Cancer Institute that will demonstrate the use of nanowire sensors for early detection of prostate cancer. In principle, he says, you could design a centimeter-square chip to detect a billion things simultaneously, even variations in an individual’s DNA. An undergraduate student of his is taking this idea even further, and working to create a biological computing interface.

Another unusual property of Lieber’s nanowires is ballistic conductivity – that is, when you introduce an electron into such a system, it travels through the conductor without losing energy. This property could help reduce the heating that occurs when electrons flow through normal wires – a serious problem in highly integrated electronics. One of Lieber’s graduate students has combined nanowires to create light sources and detectors. This would allow optical circuits – “light is always much faster than electrons,” says Lieber – to be integrated into a nanowire-based computer. “Who knows?” he says. “This may be a way of enabling the concept of quantum computing.”

In classical computers, transistors or bits must be either on or off, set to one or to zero. But in a quantum computer, the bits are simultaneously both one and zero. This is called a superposition. Light exhibits this property in the sense that it is both a wave and a particle: it is a wave, or kind of superposition, until it is detected; at that moment, it becomes a particle, a single photon in a single place. Superposition theoretically allows quantum computers to solve complex algorithms (such as those used in cryptography) that would be impossible for a conventional computer to tackle. The time may be ripe for a new motto: Think small. Really small.

Share this page to Telegram

Categories: Breaking News, World News

Tagged as:

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

20 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
trackback
12 days ago

[…] Flashback: Charles Lieber’s Liquid Computing […]

GundelP
GundelP
12 days ago

Lieber’s background and working with China is also very interesting.

I hope the link is allowed….

https://blog.nomorefakenews.com/2020/02/20/behind-the-explosive-charles-lieber-scandal/

GundelP
GundelP
Reply to  GundelP
12 days ago

Watch how big ‘enemy’ China is… oh, there are no such thing as globalism and that all the leaders, no matter which country, works for the same power including the US and China.

““Whatever extracurricular arrangements Lieber may have had in China, his Harvard lab was a paragon of U.S.-China collaboration. He relied on a pipeline of China’s brightest Ph.D. students and postdocs, often more than a dozen at a time, to produce prize-winning research on the revolutionary potential of so-called nanowires in biomedical implants. Dozens of Lieber’s 100 or so former lab members from China have chosen to stay in the U.S. Many now lead their own nanoscience labs at top universities, including Duke, Georgia Tech, MIT, Stanford, University of California at Berkeley, and UCLA.”

I’d say that’s pretty big technology-transfer WOW right there.

“In the 1990s and 2000s, as Lieber’s achievements and stature were taking off, U.S. research institutions and grant makers pumped money and moral support into expanding the burgeoning collaborations between scientists in the U.S. and other countries, particularly China. The new paradigm was globalization, China was an emerging economic power, and Lieber’s lab became an exemplar of pan-Pacific collaboration. “

Another WOW. Not a leak of information. A flood.

“A more controversial Lieber protégé is Liqiang Mai, the international dean and chair of materials science at WUT, the little-known school in Wuhan that prosecutors allege recruited Lieber to be a ‘strategic scientist’ in 2011, for 50,000 USD a month. Mai, who hasn’t been named in any U.S. filings against Lieber, earned a doctorate at WUT in 2004 and worked as a postdoc in Lieber’s lab from 2008 to 2011, according to Mai’s WUT online bio…””

Viddal Baboon
Viddal Baboon
12 days ago

MARCH 28, 2020 CHARLES M. LIEBER AND THE QUEEN’S QINETIQ
https://tinyurl.com/tdceyyo

Indicted Harvard carbon nanotube bio-warfare [likely constructed the Coronavirus nanotube 5G delivery system] professor Charles M. Lieber has hidden from public disclosure that his father (the son of a Romanian Jewish émigré candy manufacturer Leo Lieber), Robert I. Lieber, was a satellite tracking and radar spy for RCA’s AEGIS satellite system (Sir Geoffrey Pattie, Privy Council, NBC, GE, BBC, Sarnoff) now managed by Lockheed Martin, SERCO, QinetiQ and the British Privy Council.

Lockheed Martin is controlled by the Queen’s Golden Share. RCA became SERCO & QinetiQ and now manages much of America’s large-scale infrastructure, including FEMA, air traffic control, Obamacare, OMB, OPM, SES, State Department, warfighting, and even including managing the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

The U.S. Patent Office has blocked access to Robert Lieber’s weaponized patents, even though this patent is out of his normal radar expertise.

They were discovered in well-presented form at the German Patent Office:

FR App. No. 1,369,330. (Jul. 06, 1964). [FR] Data processing system, Inventors: Hans Karl Flesch, Fredrick Theodore Gutmann, Robert Lieber. filed Apr. 11, 1962, assigned to International Standard Electric Corp., New York, N.Y. (USA). French Patent Office.

DE App. No. 1424634. (Jan. 30, 1969). [DE] Data processing system, Inventors: Flesch Hans Karl, Frederick Theodore Gutman, Robert Lieber. filed Apr. 25, 1962, assigned to International Standard Electric Corp., New York, N.Y. (V. St. A.). German Patent and Trademark Office (DPMA).

U.S. Patent No. 3,204,086. (Aug. 31, 1965). Data Processing Systems. Inventors Hans K. Flesch, Glen Cove, N.Y., and Fredrick T. Gutmann, Caldwell, and Robert Lieber, West Orange, N.J., assignors to International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation, Nutley, N.J., a corporation of Maryland Filed Apr. Z7, 1961, Ser. No. 106,090 16 Claims.

Note: The U.S. Patent Office (USPTO) is blocking PUBLIC PAIRS (full record of an application) and even SIMPLE SEARCH access to this Robert Lieber patent.

Here’s the proof that the U.S. Patent Office is blocking access to the Robert Lieber patent:

Robert Lieber Search. (Accessed Mar. 29, 2020). Illustration that the Patent Office is blocking access to U.S. Pat. No. 3,204,086 awarded to Robert I. Lieber, RCA, father of prolific Harvard carbon nanotube professor Charles M. Lieber indicted for espionage. USPTO.

APRIL 21, 2020 EXPOSING HARVARD’S CHINESE AGENT CHARLES LIEBER’S “VIRUS TRANSMITTERS”
https://aim4truth.org/2020/04/21/cat-report-371/

Chinese Agent Charles Lieber & His Virus Transmitters April 20, 2020
https://greatgameindia.com/chinese-agent-charles-lieber-his-virus-transmitters/

MAY 28, 2020 CHARLES M. LIEBER USES VIRUSES, NANOTECHNOLOGY, AND 5G TO ERADICATE HUMANITY https://tinyurl.com/yck3z9sj
https://tinyurl.com/jz7nrdra

May 11, 2020 WHISTLEBLOWER NAILS FAUCI, ROTHSCHILDS, HIGHLANDS GROUP, DARPA, DOD, PIRBRIGHT, SERCO, QINETIQ, GOLDMAN SACHS, US NAVY, US AIR FORCE, US ARMY, CIA IN WORLDWIDE BIOTERROR https://tinyurl.com/yacyluj3

April 18. 2020 DAVID SARNOFF – RCA, NBC, PILGRIMS SOCIETY, IMPERIAL BRITISH TERRORIST
https://tinyurl.com/yc3ylakq

March 16. 2020 THE QUEEN’S CROWN VIRUS MUST BE DESTROYED BEFORE IT DESTROYS HUMANITY
https://TINYURL.COM/RT7Q8SY

April 21, 2020 VACCINE WARS ARE BRITISH IMPERIAL WARS https://tinyurl.com/bdfb9jbt
Raw audio file: https://tinyurl.com/2p8nfhdb

March 26, 2020 THE MEN WHO END HUMANITY
Meet IBM’s SS Dr. Mengele – Donald S. Bethune – who collaborates with Harvard’s recently indicted SS Prof. Charles M. Lieber to provide the Anglo-American Pilgrims Society the technology for “the end of human kind” (incl. Coronavirus) (their words) https://tinyurl.com/wpo8xu7

March 20, 2020 NANOTECHNOLOGY WEAPONIZED TO DELIVER VIRUSES
https://tinyurl.com/5n9bz84e
Change one word (drug to [Corona]virus) in this paper and this delivery system becomes a bioweapon.

Gangi, Mirzaei, Dalirandeh. (Jul. 05, 2017). https://tinyurl.com/5xs25e25 Molecular origin of drug release by water boiling inside carbon nanotubes from reactive molecular dynamics simulation and DFT perspectives. Sci Rep 7, 4669.
Molecular origin of drug release by water boiling inside carbon nanotubes from reactive molecular dynamics simulation and DFT perspectives
M. Darvish Ganji, Sh. Mirzaei & Z. Dalirandeh 
Scientific Reports volume 7, Article number: 4669 (2017) 
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-04981-2

March 12, 2020 DR. DONALD T. GANTZ BUILDS MASS SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS
Meet professor helping to build the mass surveillance, bio-weaponry Mark of the Beast for the Pilgrims Society https://tinyurl.com/3mnswbt3

Charles M. Lieber. Harvard University
“We would work directly from our brains, Integrating 3D Nanoelectronics with our neural networks.”
https://tinyurl.com/2mzbtd23

Piotr Bein
Piotr Bein
12 days ago

En.Wiki on Lieber about Feb 2020:

Charles M. Lieber (born 1959) is an American chemist and pioneer in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. In 2011, Lieber was recognized by Thomson Reuters as the leading chemist in the world for the decade 2000-2010 based on the impact of his scientific publications.[1] Lieber has published over 400 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and has edited and contributed to many books on nanoscience.[2] He is the principal inventor on over fifty issued US patents and applications, and founded the nanotechnology company Nanosysin 2001 and Vista Therapeutics in 2007.[3] He is known for his contributions to the synthesis, assembly and characterization of nanoscale materials and nanodevices, the application of nanoelectronic devices in biology, and as a mentor to numerous leaders in nanoscience.[4] In 2012, Lieber was awarded Israel’s Wolf Prize in Chemistry. [5]
On January 28, 2020, Lieber was arrested on charges of making false statements to the U.S. Department of Defense and to Harvard investigators regarding his participation in China’s Thousand Talents Program.[6][7] The program was created by the Chinese government to pay foreign scientists for access to their research. In addition, his house was raided by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_M._Lieber

Piotr Bein
Piotr Bein
12 days ago

A sample of scientific articles on nano-neuro-mesh research:

For more in English, click the Polish titles under “Nano-dust, neuro-dust and -mesh, Smart Dust” on my older blog at https://grypa666.wordpress.com/5g-brama-do-transhumanizmu/

There is more, I randomly selected comprehensible headings only, and did not update since ca. 2019.
..
 

trackback
5 days ago

[…] News) In its November-December 2001 issue, Harvard Magazine published an exposé called “Liquid Computing” that highlighted a then-new technology in which nanoparticles were […]

trackback
5 days ago

[…] News) In its November-December 2001 issue, Harvard Magazine published an exposé called “Liquid Computing” that highlighted a then-new technology in which nanoparticles were […]

trackback
5 days ago

[…] News) In its November-December 2001 issue, Harvard Magazine published an exposé called “Liquid Computing” that highlighted a then-new technology in which nanoparticles were […]

trackback
4 days ago

[…] its November-December 2001 issue, Harvard Magazine published an exposé called “Liquid Computing” that highlighted a then-new technology in which nanoparticles were […]

trackback
4 days ago

[…] its November-December 2001 issue, Harvard Magazine published an exposé called “Liquid Computing” that highlighted a then-new technology in which nanoparticles […]

trackback
4 days ago

[…] its November-December 2001 issue, Harvard Magazine published an exposé called “Liquid Computing” that highlighted a then-new technology in which nanoparticles were […]

trackback
4 days ago

[…] its November-December 2001 issue, Harvard Magazine published an exposé called “Liquid Computing” that highlighted a then-new technology in which nanoparticles were […]

trackback
4 days ago

[…] its November-December 2001 issue, Harvard Magazine published an exposé called “Liquid Computing” that highlighted a then-new technology in which nanoparticles were […]

trackback
4 days ago

[…] its November-December 2001 issue, Harvard Magazine published an exposé called “Liquid Computing” that highlighted a then-new technology in which nanoparticles were […]

trackback
3 days ago

[…]      ( Natural News ) En su número de Noviembre-Diciembre de 2.001, Harvard Magazine publicó una exposición llamada «Computación líquida», que destacaba una tecnología entonces nueva, en la que las […]

trackback
1 day ago

[…] its November-December 2001 issue, Harvard Magazine published an exposé called “Liquid Computing” that highlighted a then-new technology in which nanoparticles were […]