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Huge Issues in NHS Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Emergency Care Services

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Increased action is needed to tackle health and social care staffing shortages in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, which have left the region’s urgent and emergency care services struggling to cope and patients at risk of avoidable harm, the Care Quality Commission (“CQC”) said on Friday.

The findings show the region’s urgent and emergency services are under significant pressure; with overcrowding and excessive waiting times in urgent and emergency care departments, delayed ambulance handovers, poor discharge processes, and an increase in delayed discharges among the key issues identified.

This latest review is part of a series of CQC reviews into urgent and emergency care, which considers how services work together in a geographic area to ensure people receive the right care in the right place at the right time. 

Earlier this month, the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (“RCEM”) described as “staggering” survey findings showing more than 1,000 patients waiting longer than 12 hours in emergency departments in England every day. It said the findings in its report, Tip of the iceberg: 12-hour stays in the Emergency Department, demonstrated the “deep crisis” facing the NHS and the urgent and emergency care system.


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(Source for this article: ‘Staff Shortages Causing Huge Issues in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Warns CQC’, 24 June 2022. Read the full article published by Medscape HERE.)

Mandy Williams, CQC’s director of integrated care, inequalities and improvement, said:

“Despite this pressure, staff went above and beyond for patients in many of the services we inspected in the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Integrated Care System.

“However, people didn’t always receive timely care and treatment in the most appropriate service for their needs.

“This led to overcrowding in urgent and emergency care departments, which created avoidable pressure for staff who were trying to ensure patient safety, and it also delayed ambulance handovers. 

“We found staff shortages in adult social care meant people remained in hospital when they should have been discharged to respite services. This reduced the number of available beds elsewhere in hospitals where patients in emergency departments could be referred.”

Responding to the CQC’s findings, Jan Thomas, chief executive of Cambridgeshire and Peterborough ICS, said: “We have already taken forward a range of service changes to improve urgent and emergency care from projects to reduce ambulance waiting times and investment in GP telephony systems to virtual waiting rooms so people can wait at home rather than in hospital and investment in discharge capacity.”

Investment in GP telephony systems?  It would be interesting to know what telephony systems? For virtual doctor-patient consultations perhaps?

And surely “virtual waiting rooms”, whereby people who need emergency care wait at home until the hospital notifies them there is space to accommodate them is not solving any issues, except perhaps to give the appearance that hospitals are not overcrowded.

Pre-Covid injection roll out, every winter season NHS hospitals suffered “overcrowding.”  Post-Covid injection rollout, it seems as if NHS is in a year-round “winter season.”  Neither the NHS nor the CQC are addressing the elephant in the room – harms caused by the experimental and dangerous Covid injections.

Below are some of our previously published articles which may give some insight into why a year-round winter season could be the “new normal” for the NHS:

Source for featured image: Shocking photos reveal the true scale of Britain’s A&E crisis – with mothers and children on floors and pensioners on trolleys being cared for by ‘corridor nurses’, Daily Mail, 7 February 2017

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Samantha Hall
Samantha Hall

survey findings showing more than 1,000 patients waiting longer than 12 hours in emergency departments in England every day. It said the findings in its report, Tip of the iceberg: 12-hour stays in the Emergency Department, demonstrated the “deep crisis” facing the NHS and the urgent and emergency care system.

Bob - Enough
Bob - Enough
3 months ago

All by design. Just click on the links = https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/find-out-more/

Commenter
Commenter
3 months ago

So this was a problem before covid but is now made worse by vaccine aftermath. Can someone with insight say why there is always a shortage of doctors at the NHS when loads of them graduate every year from UK universities, plus the ones that are imported?

I know NHS is actively hiring nurses from abroad. Still, things don’t add up.

boris
boris
Reply to  Commenter
3 months ago

i call it Plandemic of the Injected!

boris
boris
3 months ago

same thing is happening in Australia , hospital are at capacity and more
The Injected are dying at a higher rate than ever before!
so much protecting them , you can still get it , transmit it and die from it in hospital! Discrimination against the Unvaccinated, its wrong