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Signs of Vitamin D Deficiency and Recommended Dietary Intake

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Vitamin D deficiency can result from inadequate exposure to sunlight; malabsorption; accelerated catabolism from certain medications; and, in infants, the minimal amount of vitamin D found in breast milk. In children, vitamin D deficiency can result in rickets, which presents as bowing of the legs; in adults, it results in osteomalacia, which presents as a poorly mineralised skeletal matrix.

A 2011 paper published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism aimed to provide guidelines to clinicians for the evaluation, treatment, and prevention of vitamin D deficiency.

“Considering that vitamin D deficiency is very common in all age groups and that few foods contain vitamin D, the Task Force recommended supplementation at suggested daily intake and tolerable upper limit levels, depending on age and clinical circumstances,” the authors concluded.


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Most dietary sources of vitamin D do not contain sufficient amounts of vitamin D to satisfy daily requirements – for example, 8 oz of fortified milk (8 oz) contains 100 IU; a serving of fortified cereal, 40-80 IU; and, a tablet of most multivitamins, 400 IU.  Adults and children older than 1-year-old at risk of deficiency require at least 600 IU/day.

Unprotected sun exposure is the major source of vitamin D for both children and adults. The provision of vitamin D from sunlight is as follows:

  • Sensible sun exposure, especially between the hours of 10 am and 3 pm, produces vitamin D in the skin that may last twice as long in the blood compared with ingested vitamin D.
  • Full-body sun exposure producing slight pinkness in light-skinned persons results in vitamin D production equivalent to ingesting 10,000-25,000 IU.
  • Increased skin pigmentation, ageing, and sunscreen use reduce the skin’s vitamin D3 production.

Recommended dietary intake of vitamin D for patients at risk of vitamin D deficiency is as follows :

  • In infants and children up to 1 year old, at least 400 IU/day, to maximise bone health.
  • In children and adolescents 1-18 years of age, at least 600 IU/day to maximise bone health.
  • In adults 19-50 years of age, at least 600 IU/day to maximise bone health and muscle function.
  • Raising the serum 25(OH)D level consistently above 30 ng/mL may require vitamin D intake of at least 1000 IU/day.

Whether recommended levels of vitamin D intake will provide all the potential non-skeletal health benefits associated with vitamin D is currently unknown, Medscape wrote.

Medscape’s article ‘Vitamin D Deficiency and Related Disorders’ summarises information on how vitamin D deficiency can be clinically diagnosed and treated. Read the full article HERE.

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5 months ago

[…] April 21, 2022Signs of Vitamin D Deficiency and Recommended Dietary Intake […]

Birdbrain
Birdbrain

D3 requires magnesium for uptake.

Another Trumper
Another Trumper
Reply to  Birdbrain
5 months ago

Others say to take vitamin K2, which I do. Magnesium isn’t an issue.. I put magnesium in my water, so I get it that way, plus there are many foods that are high in magnesium:

  • pumpkin seeds, 30g (156mg)
  • chia seeds, 30 g (111mg)
  • almonds, 30g (80mg of magnesium)
  • spinach, boiled, ½ cup (78mg)
  • cashews, 30g (74mg)
  • peanuts, ¼ cup (63mg)
  • soymilk, 1 cup (61mg)
  • oatmeal, 1 cup cooked (6 mg)
  • bread, whole wheat, 2 slices (46mg)
  • avocado, cubed, 1 cup (44mg)
  • rice, brown, cooked, ½ cup (42mg)
  • milk, 1 cup (24mg)

I favor almonds, peanuts, milk and occasionally spinach.

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5 months ago

[…] !  Signs of Vitamin D Deficiency and Recommended Dietary Intake    BY RHODA […]

drift2boat
drift2boat
5 months ago

The primary source of vit D is UVB sunlight, not food. North of 35 degrees UVB does not reach the ground from about Oct 15 through March 15. To get blood level up to what is achieved by 15 minutes of daily greater than 70% body expose requires about 7500 IU daily for a 150 pound male. Normal blood level range is 30 to 100 ng/ml. Mid range is 65 ng/ml. Vit D reacts with over 2000 genes in the body, making it really a hormone. For a start, suggest reading “Embrace the Sun” by Mark Sorenson, Ph.D. and William Grant, Ph.D.

Another Trumper
Another Trumper
Reply to  drift2boat
5 months ago

Ever wonder why no mainstream news or national/global health organization ever mentioned vitamin D during the plandemic? Well, check out this graph that depicts mortality vs vitamin D level (the red line) for patients hospitalized with COVID. This is from back around the time of the lockdown in the US.

(The green line is the average age of hospitalized patients, which is about 60 across the board.)

Notice, neither line extends beyond 34ng/ml. That’s because in this study there were no patients hospitalized with COVID w/ D levels 34ng/ml and higher.

Vit D vs mortality in hospitalized patients.JPG
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5 months ago

[…] April 21, 2022Signs of Vitamin D Deficiency and Recommended Dietary Intake […]

Another Trumper
Another Trumper
5 months ago

This comment is only about D3 intake for adults, though I suspect that the recommendations in this article for children is similarly too low:
For maximal health benefit (which includes resistance to COVID), adults should supplement with D3 @ 5,000 iu/day and target a 25(OH)D of 60ng/ml, which is much higher than this article recommends. So say Drs Mercola and Zelenco.
Rickets is the disease that requires the absolute least amount of D to prevent, so nobody should base how much D3 to take based only on preventing rickets. To maximize your immune system’s strength based only on your level of 25(OH)D, 30ng/ml won’t cut it. Studies have shown that adults taking 10,000 iu/day for extended amount of time show no ill effects, so for the general adult population there is little risk to supplementing w/ 5k iu D3 per day. The ratio of iu D3 to 25(OH)D is 100iu to 1ng/ml – so, if you are tracking your intake of D3 and know your 25(OH)D, you can intelligently adjust your intake of D3. Of course, if you are in an area where the sun is strong enough to produce vitamin D and you are light skinned, exposing a significant amount of your skin to the sun for at least 20-30 minutes 2 or 3 days a week during a time when the sun is strong enough to cause a sun burn, that should provide you with all of the D you need to be healthy and you can forgo supplementing with D3.
There’s a very simple rule of thumb that will tell you if the sun is strong enough to produce vitamin D. Look at your shadow. If it is shorter than you, then the sun can make D, if your shadow is taller than you, then the sun is not strong enough.
Vitamin D production requires UVB light. Studies have shown that the optimum wavelength for human skin to produce D is around 295nm. At this wavelength, D production is maximized while sunburn is minimized. There are manufacturers of lights with this as a design basis, but they are a little pricey. Pretty sure that lights used for the maintenance of pet lizards adapted to a desert environment would do the job, but they are not optimized like the purpose specific lights targeting say 200 – 298nm. Spring for a UVB meter and be very careful if you go for the UV light approach – do your own research.
If you think you have COVID, Dr McCullough’s ‘Multifaceted highly targeted sequential multidrug treatment of early ambulatory high-risk SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19)’ says to take 20,000 iu D3 per day for between 3 and 30 days (along with other nutraceuticals), so keep that detail in mind too. https://aapsonline.org/stem-the-tide-of-covid-hospitalizations-deaths/

Robin Whittle
Robin Whittle
5 months ago

For a 70 kg person no suffering from obesity to raise their 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (over several months) to the 50 ng/mL 125 nmol/L level required for proper immune system function, they should take 70 to 100 IU a day per kg bodyweight, so this is 5000 to 7000 IU/day. An IU is only 1/40,000,000 of a gram, so 5000 IU is 0.125 milligrams = a gram every 22 years.

The above article’s recommended intakes are based on discredited research. Please see: “What every MD, immunologist, virologist and epidemiologist should know about vitamin D and the immune system” https://vitamindstopscovid.info/05-mds/ and https://nutritionmatters.substack.com .

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5 months ago

[…] April 21, 2022Signs of Vitamin D Deficiency and Recommended Dietary Intake […]

SheWasAsking4It
SheWasAsking4It
5 months ago

I read a few books about vitamin D, and for a few weeks I was taking 100,000 IU of Vitamin D and I felt pretty damn great. Lol.

I was clearly deficient.